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Construction materials badly needed in ‘Odette’-hit areas

The suppliers are reportedly wary of possible acute shortage of construction materials due to some importation rules under an administrative order implemented by the Department of Trade and Industry a year ago

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Various organizations and corporations, as part of their corporate social responsibility programs, are mobilizing their disaster relief teams to help residents of Central Visayas and Mindanao rebuild their homes damaged by super typhoon “Odette” last month.

As of this writing, the UN OCHA (United Nations – Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs) reports that over 8 million people were affected. Around 340,000 people were displaced with over 226,000 people still in evacuation areas. A total of 1.4 million houses have been damaged as over 400,000 were destroyed in Surigao del Norte, Dinagat Islands, Southern Leyte, Bohol, Cebu, Negros Oriental and Palawan.

News reports said residents of affected areas are in search of construction materials to rebuild their abodes but unfortunately, people were prevented from undertaking repairs due to a huge lack of said supplies. Just like in any crisis situation you may have the money to buy but the problem is that you may not have the materials readily available.

Humanitarian organizations and local governments have appealed for construction materials for dwellings that have been severely affected by typhoon “Odette”. The supply shortage in the provinces affected by the howler resulted in the need for an increase in construction materials.

One only needs to see the sad situation of residents who were using scrap materials so they could use these just to get a roof and ample protection over their heads.

Disaster relief programs have been mobilized to help residents of affected areas to get back on their feet and rebuild their homes damaged by Category 5 winds of “Odette”.

To alleviate their plight, various donors are procuring construction materials. Local suppliers are adamant and are scrambling to provide and send the raw materials needed by the affected areas.

The suppliers are reportedly wary of possible acute shortage of construction materials due to some importation rules under an administrative order implemented by the Department of Trade and Industry a year ago.

The local construction materials manufacturers and suppliers are concerned that they might not be able to quickly replenish their stocks if they send their available supplies to affected areas. This is due to the import restrictions imposed on construction materials, including galvanized flat sheet materials for roofing.

Under the department order, foreign suppliers of galvanized flat sheet materials are required to submit PS License before their products can enter the local market.

Here’s hoping that those affected by “Odette” get back on their feet soon. The country has already suffered too much last year due to both the pandemic and the typhoon. Praying that 2022 will be a much better year for the Philippines.

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