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Hit the road

Individuals have either embraced it as an integral part of their athletic prowess, a stress reliever, meditation or a doctor’s prescription for keeping one’s self in shape — or even sane.

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PhotographS by Ronald De Los Reyes for the Daily Tribune

Running has been mankind’s basic form of locomotion, other than walking per se. Combining velocity and kinetic energy, it thrusts one forward at speeds that can push him to the limits of his kinesis. Either by jogging or by sprinting, it is said that our ancestors developed this ability — even running for long distances — about 2.6 million years ago as a means to hunt for food.

Eventually, this physical activity developed into competitive racing, with our forefathers chronicling its inception back to the Tailteann Games in Ireland between 632 BCE and 1,171 BCE, with the first-ever recorded Olympic Games taking place in 776 BCE.

A runner sprints up a hill at the break of day.

Nowadays, it is known for being the world’s most accessible sport to becoming one’s own leisure activity or even simply a healthy conduit. Individuals have either embraced it as an integral part of their athletic prowess, a stress reliever, meditation or a doctor’s prescription for keeping one’s self in shape — or even sane.

For one, running enthusiast Jennifer Padallan has embraced it as her form of release from life’s daily grind.

“Running, for me, is freedom. Every time I run, my mind is liberated from life’s negativities,” she shares.

RUNNING with a team involves team work and precise coordination.

For her, she feels she can do anything every time she is out there running on the road. The tedious physical chore of her legs and feet continuously pounding on hard asphalt for hours may give her that unsurmountable soreness and fatigue.

“But the pleasure and benefits of doing it are far greater than the pain it gives,” she continues.

Moreover, for long-distance runners like Jennifer, it is one way of getting one’s self into better physical shape. With it, it makes one feel stronger and better, able to handle challenges that come along the way.

PADALLAN and her running team zoom past Cavite’s greeneries.

“Being in better shape changes you not only physically, but also mentally. It makes you feel more empowered, which leads to a happier mood,” she says.

In fact — just recently — this runner was able to top the physical event of a basic military training conducted at the Philippine Marine Barracks in Ternate, Cavite. Already deemed as a competitive runner of her own caliber, she was even one of the top finishers in the Pragman Philippines held in Batangas earlier this month.

“Running and racing allow you to set goals. People are much happier when they are working toward a goal, whether they actually achieve it or not,” she avers as she — together with her running team — prepares for the upcoming “Laban ng Lahi” race this August.

LASER-SHARP focus on the road ahead.

LONG-DISTANCE runner Jennifer Padallan feels strong and empowered as she dashes on the road.

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