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Taiwan blames China for latest WHO meeting snub

Taiwan has been hailed as an example in combating the pandemic.

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Taiwan has had one of the world's best pandemic responses. / Bangkokpost

TAIPEI, Taiwan (AFP) — Taiwan hit out at China on Monday over its continued exclusion from a crucial annual gathering of World Health Organization (WHO) members which starts this week and is focused on averting the next pandemic catastrophe.

The 74th World Health Assembly (WHA), which kicks off Monday, will arguably be one of the most important in the WHO’s history, amid calls to revamp the organization and the entire global approach to health in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

But Taiwan — which had one of the world’s best pandemic responses — remains locked out of the meeting for the fifth consecutive year, despite growing global international support for its inclusion.

That is because China, which views the self-ruled democracy as its own territory and has vowed to one day seize it, has waged an increasingly assertive campaign to keep Taipei isolated on the world stage.

On Monday foreign minister Joseph Wu urged the WHO to “maintain a professional and neutral stance, reject China’s political interference” and allow Taiwan’s participation in its meetings and activities.

“China has continued to falsely claim that appropriate arrangements have been made for Taiwan’s participation in WHO. This wholly deviates from reality,” said Wu.

Beijing’s block on Taipei from attending the WHA as an observer began after the 2016 election of Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen, who has refused to acknowledge the island is part of “one China.”

But the coronavirus pandemic crystalized support for Taiwan’s 23 million inhabitants, especially in the early days of the crisis when it defeated its own outbreak and then began supplying protection equipment around the world.

Taiwan has been hailed as an example in combating the pandemic although a cluster in recent weeks has seen infections more than triple to 4,322 cases.

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