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When do you say No?

Technology and digital may be an entire galaxy of possibilities that have done some good for our lives and the way we do things —- even kept most of our sanities during this pandemic —- but there is also the bad.

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The constant changes in the ever-growing picture of the digital landscape are part of the reason I love it so much. It fits the change I challenge myself with and revel in.

I am extremely lucky to be working in the digital industry, and I am privy to a lot of remarkable new ideas and solid lessons that guide the way I do business and interact with people. But this was not always the case.

As with life, I suppose, everything is about balance —- that double-edged sword we tread. As wonderfully fulfilling it is to be working in such a dynamic plane, one of the biggest realities people do not talk about enough about digital is that there are no boundaries.

Okay, okay. I will back up a bit.

Technology and digital may be an entire galaxy of possibilities that have done some good for our lives and the way we do things —- even kept most of our sanities during this pandemic —- but there is also the bad. With every hyper-fast transaction, there is a frazzled dude at the other end of the keyboard trying to keep it together.

When the pandemic hit, I saw a lot of my colleagues and contemporaries thrive. I myself felt at home with this set-up, having been blessed to have started my business online a few years ago. And there was only a hump of a learning curve that I admittedly have hopped over with more ease than most. I am used to the meetings online and chats that serve as my “watercooler” chismis, as this is how I have been operating for a few years now.

I reluctantly admit that its novelty is now weighing down on me. You see, when it was still “normal,” though most of my work would be conducted in front of a keyboard, I still had to sometimes go out for a pitch or a meeting with people physically. This inevitably kept me off the screen for a good few hours, or at the very least, 20 minutes in a meeting with a client or while I was presenting something.

I knew, when I started in the digital business, that the double-edged sword I chose to walk on —- that the very thing I love about it I will, at some point, hate as well: The accessibility. When do you say NO? Everything is important and urgent especially now.
But as religiously as I have practiced weekends unplugged with books and music, I am finding that that is harder to come by now. And as this introvert will readily admit, it is making me very frazzled. I am both happy and sad. Happy, because by all accounts, my being so busy can only mean that I. HAVE. WORK. Something that has become such a luxury this year. But sad, because, well, I need time for quiet, as we all do. Some time playing with my pets and tending to my plants. In other words, I feel the need to find time to recharge so I can be able to do the thing I love to do, which is work, but I am trying to find how to get it done.

So as I try and cram more work in a span of 24 hours, I am hoping that I can somehow find extra hours in the weekend to unplug. Hoping that whoever reads this, you get to unplug, too.

Everything starts working better when you sign off for a few hours, right?

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