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Love and infamy

America will never go to war for another country — its ‘policeman of the world’ posturing be damned.

John Henry Dodson

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Valentine’s Day has been so romanticized and looked at through rose-colored glasses (or blinders) that its many supposed origins now read more like fiction.

Most versions posit though that three Catholic saints all named Valentinus may have inspired the designation of the 14th of February as a day of love, if not a day for lovers.

All three were martyred — one a priest for his unauthorized marriage of young Roman soldiers who, with their nubile brides at home, may have lost the appetite to wage war for the emperor as they yearned to be consumed with passion.

The second was a firebrand bishop, while the third landed in the dungeon for something that has, then and now, scandalized the Church: taking a lover. The third purportedly left his paramour a letter and signed it, “Your Valentine.”

This advice may come a day late, but consider it as one graciously given, free of charge, a full year in advance of Valentine’s Day 2021.

For the Don Juans out there who have excess love to pass around, ask yourselves whether you’re heading to the gallows after signing one too many amorous letters or emails with “Your Valentine.”

Maybe you are guillotine-bound or, at the very least, a John Bobbit in the making, except you don’t know it as yet.

As Jullie Yap Daza irreverently wrote in her bestselling book “Etiquette for Mistresses,” Valentine’s Day will never be confined to just one day in February for the dapper lotharios.

The 14th will always be exclusive for the wife, while the days pre- and post-Valentine’s are for (here’s the disclaimer) the Casanovas and their smitten ones.

Levity aside, with the world now topsy-turvy with viruses like COVID-19, madmen as world leaders, planet-destroying asteroids in space and other scenarios that may push the Doomsday Clock into the 11th hour, let love and peace prevail.

And no more beheadings, please.

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There are those who think the Philippines has enjoyed the protection of the United States on account of the military treaties and agreements that had been signed by the two countries through the years.

These very same people have the mistaken notion that the Philippines had lost that protection with President Rodrigo Duterte’s scrapping of the Visiting Forces Agreement between the two countries.

That “protection” was never there in the first place as that “protection” was merely imagined and illusory.

Rody’s America-loving bashers better read on their history to know that the US had never gone to war except when attacked directly and when pushing its agendas and interests across other countries’ borders like in Iraq, Afghanistan and Iran.

British Prime Minister Winston Churchill had already known this in 1940 when America did absolutely nothing when Nazi Germany’s blitzkrieg razed Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg and France in just six weeks.

France declared Paris an open city to save it from destruction and signed an armistice in June 1940, leaving Great Britain in its lonesome to try to halt Hitler’s juggernaut.

What pushed America to the fray in WW2 was that “day that will live in infamy” when Japan attacked and destroyed the home of the US Seventh Fleet at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.

True, the US liberated the Philippines from the Japanese in 1945 during which Manila became the most bombed out city in that war after Stalingrad. But the US only did so not because MacArthur promised to “return” but because it was part and parcel of bringing the war in the Pacific theater to an end.

America will never go to war for another country — its “policeman of the world” posturing be damned. It never did so for Europe’s sake more than half a century ago and it will never do so for the Philippines today or tomorrow.

Those military agreements between the Philippines and America are not worth the paper they are printed on.

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